Direct Trade Coffee

EL RUBI - Honey El Salvador

Cup Profile

Coffee Notes

Purchase

Aroma:8.5Roasted Cocoa Nib, Brown Sugar 

Body:8.5Syrupy 

Flavor:8.5Butterscotch Candy 

Sweetness:9.0Honeydew 

Aftertaste:9.0Tangerine, Honey, Cocoa 

Acidity:9.0 

Roast:2Very Light 

This coffee will begin roasting on Monday, September 22nd.

A deep brown sugar aroma, syrupy body and citric acidity. This coffee has a strong note of butterscotch candy with a honeydew sweetness. A mild tangerine note and soft honey linger in the finish.

Direct Trade Farm

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The Story

This coffee will begin roasting on Monday, September 22nd. All coffee and merchandise in your order will be produced and shipped on the same day unless otherwise specified in the Order Notes section of your shopping cart. Please see our FAQ for more details.

El Rubi is a farm within the Finca Las Mercedes family of farms. Owned by the Ortiz family, Finca Las Mercedes has everything we look for in a Direct Trade farm. This honey coffee has been a crowd favorite during our fall offerings over the past several years and we are pleased to be offering it again this season!

The Bourbon varietal from El Rubi is grown at an elevation between 4900 and 5250 feet near Santiago De Maria in El Salvador. El Rubi was processed using the Pulped Natural method, also known as the Honey Process. The process begins similar to a standard wet processed coffee. The skin of the cherry is removed from the seed using a de-pulper shortly after harvesting. By removing the skin, only the green coffee covered by a protective shell called parchment is left. In the washed method of processing, the parchment is then fermented to remove or loosen the cherry pulp stuck to the bean before it is cleaned in the washing process.

In January, PT’s Green Coffee Buyer Jeff Taylor traveled to El Salvador to observe the roya outbreak and its impact on our Direct Trade partner farms. He was impressed by Lucia’s proactive and aggressive strategy to prevent this disease hitting the farm.

From his blog post: “At Las Mercedes they were in the early stages of renovation of the farm and had thousands of seedlings ready to be planted. This helped keep the damage caused by roya to a minimum as they cut, replaced, and treated new trees months before harvest. They are also aggressively diversifying their crop with multiple coffee varieties that are more resistant to roya.”

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